Thursday, 26 May 2016

What is Tracking System?


Generally a tracking system is used for the observing of persons or objects on the move and supplying a timely ordered sequence of respective location data to a model e.g. capable to serve for depicting the motion on a display capability.

Tracking in virtual space

In virtual space technology, a tracking system is generally a system capable of rendering virtual space to a human observer while tracking the observer’s body coordinates. For instance, in dynamic virtual auditory space simulations, a real-time head tracker provides feedback to the central processor, allowing for selection of appropriate head-related transfer functions at the estimated current position of the observer relative to the environment.

Tracking in real world

There are myriad tracking systems. Some are ‘lag time’ indicators, that is, the data is collected after an item has passed a point for example a bar code or choke point or gate. Others are ‘real-time’ or ‘near real-time’ like Global Positioning Systems depending on how often the data is refreshed. There are bar-code systems which require a person to scan items and automatic identification (RFID auto-id). For the most part, the tracking worlds are composed of discrete hardware and software systems for different applications. That is, bar-code systems are separate from Electronic Product Code (EPC) systems, GPS systems are separate from active real time locating systems or RTLS for example, a passive RFID system would be used in a warehouse to scan the boxes as they are loaded on a truck – then the truck itself is tracked on a different system using GPS with its own features and software. The major technology “silos” in the supply chain are:

  • Distribution/Warehousing/Manufacturing
  • Yard Management
  • Fleet Management
  • Attendance Management


Types of Tracking Systems


  • GPS Applications
  • Real-time Locating Systems (RTLS)



Content Source :- Wikipedia
Image Source :- Google Images

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